Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich by Norman Ohler

It is a disconcerting thing hearing your own recorded voice played back. Who knew I was so high pitched and squeaky? Am I really that annoying and uncertain? Disappointingly, my tones are neither dulcet nor melodic. And as for my attempts at karaoke… let’s just say I sound fabulously Gwen Stefani-esqe under the hypnotic cocktail of a late night and one too many vodkas.

If it is possible to fall in love with a voice, then colour me cupid, I’ve been hit! This person, whom I’ve never met, could seriously lead me to drink the Kool-Aid á la Jim Jones or have me bailed up in a ranch á la David Koresh. Perhaps it is due to my aforementioned *cough* unforgiving pitch that sees me hold phonic gifts in such hard regard. Whatever it is. Oh my lord that voice!!!

Conversations with Richard Fidler is a radio show I listen to on podcast. Fidler, the mellifluously blessed one, interviews anyone and everyone, from those who are extraordinary or have been through extraordinary circumstances. For a person blessed with such an incredible intonation (YES I AM OBSESSED GET OVER IT), Fidler has an incredible capacity to listen. Fidler’s supreme skill is to hear what his guests are saying and then respond and ask questions accordingly. He quips when appropriate and also has an incredible capacity for empathy and understanding.

It was listening to this podcast that I discovered this book. My proclivity for all things German history is well documented (here and here). But having studied modern history in various guises for a number of years, it requires a truly original slant in order to pique my interest.

*cut to Blitzed *

The historical thesis posited by Ohler, if correct, makes Walter White look like an amateur. This text is compelling in an oh-gosh-like-what-the-actual-f*ck-way. In part, this may be due to the fact that the well documented and understood atrocities instructed by Hitler are so non-humane, that an explanation like drug use/abuse goes somewhere to give meaning to the unforgivable.

The research seems sound enough. Regardless, it is fascinating reading about the history of the various big German drug companies that are still dominating the market today.

But if you don’t want to read the book, listen to Richard’s pod cast.

And Richard, if you do want to get in touch, don’t email.

CALL ME 😉

 

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